Gifts in wills


Having a valid Will in place is important for you because otherwise your money, property and possessions might not be allocated as you would wish.


If you'd like to discuss
including Livability in your will

We rely on gifts in wills for over a third of our income,
so would love to hear from you.


Having a valid Will in place is important for you because otherwise your money, property and possessions might not be allocated as you would wish.

Gifts in Wills are important for us because we rely on them for more than a third of our donated income. In fact, without them much of our life-transforming work simply wouldn’t be possible.

Every supporter who remembers us in this way – whether the gift is large or small – is helping to secure our future, so we can be there for the disabled people who’ll need us in the decades ahead.

Funds from supporters who left us gifts in their Wills in the past are making a real difference today. For instance, they have helped to fund a new hydrotherapy pool at one of our education centres. We needed to replace the old pool in order to provide more suitable facilities for the disabled students using it. The new hydrotherapy pool features a ‘direct to pool’ hoist and sensory equipment like bubble jets and sound, enabling the children and young people who use it to benefit from pain relief, exercise, relaxation and fun.

These precious gifts are also helping to pay for much-needed improvements to the facilities in our care homes, and are helping to provide services and transport to enable disabled adults to get out and about, pursue hobbies and interests and make new friends.

Whatever your reason for choosing to support Livability in this special way, you will most certainly be helping to create a brighter future for disabled children and adults.

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We recommend consulting a solicitor when making or changing a Will. There are several kinds of gifts you can give. These include:

Residuary legacy

The whole or a share/ percentage of whatever remains from your estate once all other gifts and expenses have been deducted. This is the most flexible type of gift and combats inflation because the value of your gift increases automatically.

Pecuniary legacy

A set sum of money. Please be aware that a pecuniary legacy won’t keep its value in line with inflation unless your Will states the gift is to be ‘index-linked’, which means the sum of money will be linked to the index of retail prices.

Specific legacy

A specific item like a house, a piece of jewellery or an antique.

If you decide to leave a gift in your Will to Livability, here is our suggested wording for the two most common types of gift – residuary legacies and pecuniary legacies. Please note that the appropriate wording may differ in Scotland and Northern Ireland – your solicitor will be able to advise on the correct terms.

Residuary legacy (share/ percentage of estate)

I give […] % (or all) of the residue of my real and personal estate to Livability (Registered Charity Number 1116530) of 6 Mitre Passage, London, SE10 0ER and I DECLARE that the receipt of the Treasurer or other appropriate officer shall be a complete discharge to my executors.

I FURTHER DECLARE THAT if before my death Livability has changed its name or amalgamated with or transferred all its assets to any other body then my executors shall give effect to the gift as if it has been made to the body in its changed name or to the body which results from the amalgamation or to which the transfer has been made.

Pecuniary legacy (set sum of money)

I give the sum of £[…] to Livability (Registered Charity Number 1116530) of 6 Mitre Passage, London, Se10 0ER and I DECLARE that the receipt of the Treasurer or other appropriate officer shall be a complete discharge to my executors.

I FURTHER DECLARE THAT if before my death Livability has changed its name or amalgamated with or transferred all its assets to any other body then my executors shall give effect to the gift as if it has been made to the body in its changed name or to the body which results from the amalgamation or to which the transfer has been made.


Your solicitor can advise you on what other types of gift you could make, and the appropriate wording to use in your Will.

A gift is most useful if it’s given for the general purposes of Livability, rather than a specific project. Otherwise, if the project ceases, the gift may be invalid. However, you can always let us know your preference for where the legacy is spent by ‘expressing a wish’ in your Will – your solicitor can advise on the appropriate wording for this.


For more information about making or updating your Will, and the importance of gifts in Wills to Livability, please request a free copy of our Gift in Wills Guide here.

Making or changing your Will needn’t be complicated, but we recommend you seek the advice of a solicitor to ensure your Will is legally binding.

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Points to consider when making a Will
  1. Work out how much your estate (the value of everything you own less debts/ expenses owed) is worth.
  1. Choose your beneficiaries. These are the people and charities you wish to benefit from your Will. Many people choose to provide for their family and friends first, then leave a percentage or proportion of their estate to Livability.
  1. Name your executor(s). Executors are the people identified in your Will to make sure your instructions are carried out. An executor should be someone you trust – for instance, a relative, a friend or a solicitor. It’s a good idea to check they’re happy to be appointed beforehand.
  1. Visit a solicitor to have your Will drawn up, and to ensure it’s properly signed, dated and witnessed.
  1. Store your Will in a safe place, perhaps with your solicitor, and keep a copy yourself. Tell a relative or close friend where the original copy of your Will is stored.

Some changes in circumstance – getting married or divorced, for example – can affect your Will, so it’s important to keep it up to date.

Updating your existing Will with a gift to Livability

You might be able to use a codicil – a legal document that’s supplementary to a Will – to change your Will to include a gift to Livability, instead of making a new Will.  It’s best to seek advice from a solicitor about whether it would be appropriate to use a codicil.

For more information about making or updating your Will, and the importance of gifts in Wills to Livability, please request a free copy of our Gifts in Wills Guide here.

Christian Legacy is a unique partnership that unites a group of leading Christian charities – including Livability – who are carrying out amazing, life-transforming work.

Christian_Legacy_logoTo help ensure this work can continue in the decades to come, we aim to inspire people to seriously consider leaving one or more of these charities a gift in their Will.

By remembering a charity like Livability in your Will, you can help make the world a better place for future generations. This expression of thankfulness and hope can enable those who will come after you to influence society and change lives for the better.

Gifts in Wills are hugely important to Livability. In fact, they are our largest source of donated income. Improving facilities in our care homes, providing services to enable severely disabled adults to get out and about in their local area, and helping to fund a new hydrotherapy pool at one of our education centres are just some of the ways these special gifts have enabled disabled people to live fuller, more independent lives.

You don’t have to be wealthy to leave a life-changing gift. All gifts in Wills, whether large or small, make a difference.

For more information about making or updating your Will, and the importance of gifts in Wills to Livability, please request a free copy of our Gifts in Wills Guide here.

Or call our Supporter Services team on 020 7452 2121 (Mon – Fri, 9am – 5pm).